Psychology (Experimental)

undergraduates

Experimental Psychology undergraduates at St Edmund Hall are given close personal guidance throughout their time at the College from both the College Fellow in Psychology, Professor David Bannerman, and the College Lecturer, Dr Iana Alexeeva.  Both will assist students in structuring their personal programmes of study.

Experimental Psychology is an exciting, dynamic and diverse field in which students sample widely for the Preliminary Examinations (‘Prelims’) in the first year. This provides a broad base of knowledge with which to enter the Final Honour School. In all three years Psychology teaching is based on lectures and tutorials – much of this takes place in the University Department of Experimental Psychology where there are excellent facilities, a friendly atmosphere and much opportunity to work with students and tutors of other colleges. During the first year all students follow the same course in Psychology, but after prelims students may choose from among a wide range of course options. There is also a varied programme of practical work, and in addition each student carries out a research project which allows them to work individually with an academic who is at the cutting edge of the relevant area of psychological research.

At St. Edmund Hall there is a strong interest in neuroscience and in understanding the biological basis of psychology and behaviour. Members of the Hall have a strong interest in understanding how the brain learns and remembers, what goes wrong in the brain in psychiatric and neurological disorders , and how the brain tries to recover from injury and disease . This spans all the way from the action of different neurotransmitters and their receptors, through the activity of individual nerve cells and brain circuits, up to the behaving organism. St. Edmund Hall students will therefore have the opportunity to interact with a strong research community in psychology and neuroscience

 

Our Tutors

Professor David M Bannerman

David M
Bannerman

William R. Miller Fellow in Neuroscience and Experimental Psychology

Professor David Bannerman is the head of the University of Oxford’s Behavioural Neuroscience Unit, and teaches behavioural neuroscience.

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Professor Heidi Johansen-Berg

Heidi
Johansen-Berg

Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience and Senior Research Fellow

Professor Heidi Johansen-Berg is Director of the Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB) in the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences.

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Dr Iana Alexeeva

Iana
Alexeeva

College Lecturer in Psychology

Dr Iana Alexeeva is a College Lecturer in Psychology. Her research interests lie within the areas of health psychology, cognitive psychology, and behavioural medicine. She teaches Individual Differences, Psychological Disorders, Developmental Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Information Processing, Perception, Language and Cognition, Psychology Theories, and Health Psychology.

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Professor Rafal Bogacz

Rafal
Bogacz

Associate Lecturer in Clinical Medicine

Professor Rafal Bogacz gives tutorials on statistics and computational neuroscience. His research is particularly interested in modelling the brain networks involved in action selection and decision making, and understanding how brain dynamics change in Parkinson’s disease.

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Professor David Dupret

David
Dupret

Fellow by Special Election in Neuroscience

Professor David Dupret is a neuroscientist who delivers the systems neuroscience component of the course. The primary aim of his research programme is to understand how neuronal activity in the hippocampal circuit contributes to the acquisition, consolidation and recall of memory traces.

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Professor Charlotte Stagg

Charlotte
Stagg

Fellow by Special Election in Neuroscience

Professor Charlie Stagg is head of the Physiological Neuroimaging Group at the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences. Her primary research interest is in how changing the ease of communication between brain cells (a process known as plasticity) drives the learning of new motor skills in people, especially in the context of relearning skills after a stroke.

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Where next?

Psychology, Philosophy and Linguistics (PPL)

Undergraduate course page

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Centre for the Creative Brain

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