St Edmund Hall Blog

Research

The St Edmund Hall blog brings you the latest thought in academic research and interesting artefacts from our archive and library.

Please note that any opinions or views expressed by blog contributors are not shared or held by St Edmund Hall.

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Discovering the Earthworm’s Half a Billion Year Old Cousin

16 Jun 2020

The worms that gave rise to earthworms and leeches have half a billion years of history in the ocean. A new discovery of 514 million year old fossils from China unravels the early origins of annelids, the segmented worms.

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Gross Domestic Product could fall by huge amounts overnight

This Time is Different: Economic Policy Challenges in the Time of COVID-19

9 Jun 2020

COVID-19 has already generated challenges to the global economy and the policy responses permeate political-financial-economic stability.

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A graph showing estimated probability of infection against probability of being tested. It shows probability of being tested increases from 0 to 1 as the probability of infection increases from 0 to around 0.3, and shows the probability of being tested dropping from 1 to 0 as the probability of infection goes beyond 0.75

Testing in a Pandemic

25 May 2020

What is the best way to use our limited capacity for infectious disease testing? This blog discusses how lives can be saved by optimal adaptive targeting of tests.

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Boris Johnson with a microphone in hand stands on a stage in front of a sign saying No Heathrow

Did the Court of Appeal ‘Kill Off’ the Heathrow Third Runway?

19 May 2020

In February 2020 debates about the third runway at Heathrow took a new turn, but did the Court of Appeal really ‘kill off’ the proposal?

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Hobbe's Leviathan

Censorship and Information Control

28 Apr 2020

For the past couple of years, I have participated in a similar comparative exercise run from the University of Chicago.  This brings together people from a wide range of disciplines and occupations – historians, anth…

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Make Your Own Pi

14 Mar 2020

March 14th is Pi Day, and as of 2020 is also the official UNESCO International Day of Mathematics.

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Line drawing of Sophie Scholl by Isabella

How Should You Remember an Icon? The Story of Sophie Scholl

8 Mar 2020

How do we talk about individuals and groups who resisted Nazism? How do we do justice to the complexity of their lives and actions? Dr Alexandra Lloyd (Fellow by Special Election in German Studies) examines the case of Sophie S…

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Conservative politicians Margaret Thatcher and William Whitelaw campaigning for EEC membership in 1975

Britain, Europe, and Politically Convenient Myths

4 Mar 2020

Mikko Lievonen discusses Britain’s entry into the European Economic Community in the 1970s.

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Zac Cesaro (2nd year DPhil in Engineering Science) working at UK Demonstrator, in front of electrolyser and Haber-Bosch synthesis loop.

From Fertiliser to Fuel

25 Feb 2020

As the world seeks pathways to rapid decarbonisation, an old technology is gaining new attention as a carbon-free fuel. This month the BBC covered a special Royal Society report focused on using “green ammonia” for…

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Russian Revolution poster in 1917 welcoming the the third communist international

Russian Revolutionary Posters

4 Feb 2020

An explosion of images accompanied the Russian Revolution. Posters were an important feature of the historical landscape: over 3,600 posters were designed and printed in millions of copies between 1918 and 1921, the period of C…

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The 21st Century Global Economy

22 Jan 2020

The world changed dramatically in the latter part of the 20th century. The conclusion of the Cold War at the end of the 1980s heralded a period of not only profound political but also economic change.

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12 Days of Christmas Puzzles

2 Jan 2020

Over the Christmas period we ran a Christmas puzzle challenge on our social media channels. Due to their popularity, we have compiled them all here and provided more for everyone to try in case you missed the posts.

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Disorder Quantum Affect Blog

How does disorder affect Quantum Systems?

27 Nov 2019

In this blog, Isabel Creed discusses the basic principles behind her research into how disorder affects Quantum Mechanical systems.

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Eye of Proterozoic

The History of the Earth at an Arms Length

30 Oct 2019

I study the origin of complex life. I want to understand why it took so long to go from simple single cell organisms, such as amoebas and algae, to things like multicellular organisms like plants and animals. I do this by exami…

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St Edmund Statue and the church

St Edmund of Abingdon and the Origins of the Medieval Hall

22 Oct 2019

Dr Emily Winkler on the naming and the origins of St Edmund Hall.

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An introduction to research in Computational Complexity Theory

26 Jun 2019

Professor of Computer Science and Senior Research Fellow at St Edmund Hall, Leslie Ann Goldberg introduces computational complexity theory.

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Memorial to the White Rose by the artist Robert Schmidt-Matt on the Geschwister-Scholl-Platz outside the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich

‘Long live freedom!’ – Student Resistance against the Nazis

19 Jun 2019

German tutor Dr Alexandra Lloyd discusses the White Rose, a group of students and their professor who defied the Nazis.

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I Guess the Rains Down in Africa

21 May 2019

Stipendiary Lecturer in Physical Geography Callum Munday discusses Toto, droughts and how we can better predict the future of rainfall in Africa.

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Dinosaur extinction - Roger Benson blog post

Mammals During the Extinction of Dinosaurs

8 May 2019

Professor and Tutor in Earth Sciences, Roger Benson discusses mammals and their jaws during the extinction of the dinosaurs

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Detail of a miniature of a wolf in a medieval bestiary

Celtic Magic

24 Apr 2019

English tutor, Professor Mark Williams discusses magical transformations in the Celtic ‘Four Branches of the Mabinogi’ and the problematic conflict between God’s powers and those of fictional enchanters.

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First image of a black hole - taken by the Event Horizon Telescope

Why the oohs and ahhs?

16 Apr 2019

Luminous coffee stain or momentous achievement? Professor Jeff Tseng weighs up the significance of the first picture of a black hole captured by the Event Horizon Telescope that was all over last week’s news.

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Poster for 2019's medieval mystery cycle at St Edmund Hall

A Medieval Mystery Cycle for Oxford at St Edmund Hall

28 Mar 2019

Professor Henrike Lähnemann explains the popular tradition of mystery plays in the Middle Ages, and invites you to see a modern-day version performed at the College.

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Rousseau and Mini-Fridge in Karma Nabulsi's office

Rousseauville

6 Mar 2019

Tutor in Politics and Library Fellow at St Edmund Hall, Karma Nabulsi discusses ‘The Man’, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and his relevance in Oxford.

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The cover of Linda Yueh's book, 'The Great Economists'

What we can learn from the Great Economists

20 Feb 2019

Economist Dr Linda Yueh describes how lessons from history can be invaluable in tackling current issues such as slow economic growth and why wages are so low even as the economy improves.

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A revolving door. Image by Bradley Huchteman (www.flickr.com/photos/sypsyn)

An Open and Shut Case: Membrane Transport in Health and Disease

4 Feb 2019

Professor Robert Wilkins explains the role of transport proteins and how we can target them to treat a broad spectrum of diseases, from arthritis to cancer.

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Ronald Reagan televised address from the Oval Office, outlining plan for Tax Reduction Legislation July, 1981 - White House Photo Office; Originally uploaded to Wikipedia by Happyme22 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Writing the History of Neoliberalism

15 Jan 2019

Professor David Priestland, who is currently writing a history of neoliberalism as a global phenomenon between the 1970s and 2008, explains the term and its appeal to him as a historian.

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A crochet chough in a Christmas tree in the Front Quad at St Edmund Hall

The Maths of the 12 Days of Christmas

20 Dec 2018

The question of how many legs are there in The 12 Days of Christmas was recently featured on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. Here, the author of that puzzle Dr Tom Crawford explains how to use maths to unpick the answer.

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